February 24, 2012

Mount Everest’s shrinking glaciers

Image first produced and shown at UNESCO's Outdoor Exhibition ‘Satellites and World Heritage Sites, Partners to Understand Climate Change,’ at COP16 in Cancun, Mexico. Copyright Cnes 2004 - 2010 - Distribution Astrium Services / Spot Image

Saw this photo on Responding to Climate Change  today while I was putting off doing my Calculus homework. It’s so beautiful, yet also super disturbing.

This is a photo of Nepal’s Sagarmatha National Park, home of Mount Everest (the highest peak in the world, duh), which is famous for its “dramatic mountains, glaciers and deep valleys.”  The site says:

Several rare species, such as the snow leopard and the lesser panda, are found in the park.

The air temperatures in this area have risen by 1°C since 1970, leading to a 30% decrease in snow and ice cover over the last 40 years.

A high glacier on Mount Everest, located at an altitude of 4,000 m, is now a lake.

Glacier lake outburst floods are now much more frequent, creating serious risks for human populations with grave implications for the water supply in South Asia and the flow of major rivers such as the Ganges, Indus and Brahmaputra.

I just don’t get how people can look at stuff like this and say, “Oh, it’s just totally random that this is happening, it’ll all get colder someday again and everything’ll be fine.”  As if.

In case you’re curious, Responding to Climate Change (RTCC) is an organization that’s dedicated to raising awareness about climate change issues (yay).  It also runs Climate Change TV, the world’s first-ever online video channel that’s 100% devoted to running stories about climate change.  You should check it out.   Everybody should.

 

 

 

 


November 16, 2011

MATHIAS KESSLER: ART, SCIENCE, AND ADVENTURE

Mathias Kessler is our next artist who creates photographs, video art, and installations, often featuring large-scale representations of natural landscapes. His work is particularly ambitious due to the challenges of traveling to extremely remote areas, transporting large amounts of equipment, and capturing high-quality images that can be printed in large or panorama formats. He has some incredible stories about traveling to untouched landscapes, “disaster tourism,” and modern-day exploring. His thoughts about the relationship of science to these landscapes and capturing all of these ideas in his art are not to be missed.

He was born in Austria and currently lives and works in New York. Recent solo shows have been exhibited at the National Museum for Photography in Russia, GL Holtegaard Museum in Denmark, and the Volta Art Fair in New York.
For more about his projects, please visit
mathiaskessler.com/​index.html

MATHIAS KESSLER, PART I

 

MATHIAS KESSLER, PART II

 

Interview conducted by Alix Lambert. Alix Lambert is an artist, author and filmmaker. She is an Associate Artist of The Civilians and is conducting this ongoing series of interviews for The Great Immensity. Please click HERE for more of her interviews in this series!


November 9, 2011

Protect what you love

People who surf and raft and mountain bike are maybe sort of adrenaline junkies? But a lot of outdoor sports enthusiasts get intense about environmental activism, too. It makes total sense to me to try and respect and care for the outdoor terrain you love the most.

Surfrider protects oceans and beaches.  Protect Our Winters (with the awesome acronym, POW) raises awareness about the effect of climate change on high-altitude regions like mountains.

The Access Fund keeps all kinds of outdoor climbing areas open and conserves climbing environments.  The International Mountain Biking Association creates and preserves trails, and encourages low-impact riding, volunteering, and thinking of new trail management solutions.  And American Whitewater advocates for the preservation and protection of rivers in the US.

Chances are if you have a hobby or an activity you’re really into, there’s a way to get involved with an organization that can connect you to other people and do good for the environment.

So go hang ten and drink some X-treme beverages!   (That link really makes me laugh.)

 


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