October 22, 2012

Then I saw her face / Now I’m a believer!

Not a trace  /  Of doubt in my mind!

Okay – this post isn’t about The Monkees… it’s not even about monkeys. But I’m happy to say that more people are believing in climate change these days, and they are also more sure of their beliefs. A study done in conjunction by Yale and George Mason’s Centers for Climate Change Communication has shown that general belief in and understanding of global warming has increased from 57 percent in January of 2010 to 70 percent in September of 2012, and the number of people who do not believe that global warming is happening has decreased in recent years by nearly half. For the first time since 2008, over half of Americans say that they believe that global warming is the result of human activity.  There’s lots of interesting data in this thing about people’s trust in scientists and scientific information, and about people’s growing concern about the threat that climate change poses to us now and in the future.

These changes in attitude about global warming may stem in part from people’s belief that weather in the United States has been getting worse. Over the past two years a record number of extreme weather events have occurred such as heat waves, widespread droughts, floods, wildfires and violent storms. There will be more work done to examine the public perception of the issues, and there’s still a lot more progress to be made, but I can tell you, I’m a believer and there’s not a trace of doubt in my mind!

CLICK HERE FOR THE STUDY!

To read the Washington Post article that this map is related to click here.


December 6, 2011

EDWARD MORRIS: ART & MEDIA FIGHTING CLIMATE CHANGE

We are so pleased to have Edward Morris, co-founder of The Canary Project, as the next interviewee in our Skype Interview Series. The Canary Project is an organization dedicated to producing art and media that deepen public understanding of human-induced climate change and energizing commitment to solutions. Originally founded in 2006 as a project to photograph landscapes throughout the world where scientists are studying the impacts of climate change, The Canary Project has since supported diverse projects involving more than 30 artists, designers, writers, educators and scientists. Their focus is on cultivating research-intensive projects that contribute to knowledge building and are able to communicate that knowledge in a way that both respects complexity and inspires respect for life.

They do a wide variety of work from gallery shows to installations in science centers. Green Patriot Posters is a messaging campaign centered on posters that encourage all U.S. citizens to take part in building a sustainable economy. They have commissioned posters from design leaders, and developed an on-line community for sharing and voting on original designs. In the interview, Edward Morris has some incredible insights into time, the importance of art that addresses these issues, and the necessity of science in informing this art. Plus, hear about how he came to start The Canary Project after working as a private investigator!

Click the link below to read more about their many amazing projects, to see some of the posters and art, and to see how you can get involved!

http://canary-project.org/

EDWARD MORRIS, PART I

 

EDWARD MORRIS, PART II

 

Interview conducted by Alix Lambert. Alix Lambert is an artist, author and filmmaker. She is an Associate Artist of The Civilians and is conducting this ongoing series of interviews for The Great Immensity. Please click HERE for more of her interviews in this series!


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    "The Next Forever" is a song from The Great Immensity. The footage was taken on Barro Colorado Island in the Panama Canal by videographer David Ford. Music and lyrics by Michael Friedman.
     
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